Madagascar: an island in need

More than 90% of Madagascar’s original forests have been destroyed, displacing entire animal species and taking away the Malagasy’s ability to farm and live on the land.

For many Malagasy, their income source came from cutting down mangrove trees, which is incredibly difficult labour, environmentally disastrous and quite often the promised payment is never received. Entire mangrove estuaries are gone, leaving the bare earth to wash away into the sea. The Malagasy people have no choice but to go into debt or sell themselves and their families into slavery just to survive.

The endemic dry deciduous trees on the west coast of the island have nearly all been destroyed by the slash and burn practices of the Malagasy.

Many Malagasy live below the poverty line, they find themselves entrapped in debt and taken advantage of. Many Children can’t afford to go school, perpetuating the vicious cycle of poverty and many die from malnutrition.

For many women on Madagascar the tragic cycle of being married at 13, pregnant by 14, and abandoned by 16 is all too common. Poverty and a lack of education leave many Malagasy women with little chance of breaking this cycle.

Time To Get Dirty



Gobe’s planting partner, The Eden Projects, began planting in Madagascar in 2007. The mangrove project is replenishing the enormous Malagasy mangrove forests at a rate of approx 1.4 million trees per month. Reclaiming soil, providing crucial habit for spawning fish and restoring the balance of carbon in the atmosphere for the rest of the world.

Seeds from the endemic dry deciduous trees on the west coast of the island are being propagated in nurseries by the tens of thousands and cared for by local Malagasy.

These are planted in devastated landscapes with the hope of restoring the dry deciduous forests that provide abundantly to all who live within them.

Locals are trained to be tree planters, nursery workers and managers ensuring the ongoing viability of the project; being hired by Eden Reforestation Projects locals can pay off their debts, feed their families and send their children to school.

Join the revolution and rejuvenate planet!



Where else is this happening?


Haiti

After decades of work and millions of dollars invested by the international community, Haiti remains one of the most environmentally degraded countries on earth. With 98% of Haiti’s forests already gone, the UN estimates that 30% of the nations remaining trees are being destroyed each year.

Learn more >

Nepal

A world heritage site that provides a home to Bengal Tigers, One Horned Rhinos and many other animals that are among some of the most endangered species on the planet. Our reforestation efforts will focus on restoring a buffer zone around the park that will extend the animal habitat and also be a source of income for the local villagers.

Learn more >

trees planted so far:

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