The Films Shot on Kodak Motion Films Nominated For A 2019 Oscar.

We picked our favourite films from this years Academy Award nominees and limited our choice to those shot on Kodak Motion Films.

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We picked our favourite films from this years Academy Award nominees and limited our choice to those shot on Kodak Motion Films.
Not because we think that film is inherently superior, it just would have been boring to write another listicle piece ‘our favourite Oscar films’ etc. etc. We also know you all want to know what camera and stock Spike Lee and Chayse Irvin used for BlacKkKlansman, so we mostly did it just for you.

It was recently reported that parts of Kodak Alaris were up for sale, at least the division that controls paper, film and chemicals. This follows on from years of the various Kodak arms struggling to pull themselves from massive debts. All the while it would seem pretty obvious to anybody interested in photography and cinema trends that film is on the rise. It would seem that there are more 8mm and 16mm “content shoots” popping up all over Instagram and dedicated processing labs opening their doors for still and moving image film.

A simplified hypothesis is that the economy of scale dictates this increase in consumer film use just isn’t enough to keep the production of film stocks profitable. Comparative to the days when everybody was taking all their snapshots on Kodak Gold and pro photographers were burning 30+ rolls of Portra a shoot. There were 1-hour labs in every suburb and it was gloriously affordable. The other massive consumer using hundred and thousands of feet of beautiful celluloid was, of course, Hollywood and the global moving image industry.

Here at Gobe we think both film and digital are fantastic, use whatever tools you have to create your vision, some might be more suited than others and both digital and analogue can produce engrossing results. There are many directors and cinematographers who have an intrinsic allegiance with film and they’re not just your friend’s friend making a home video on that ancient 8mm they found at Grandma’s house. It doesn’t matter if you shoot it on Ektachrome or an iPhone 5, if you’re missing the other ingredients, it’s still going to fall flat, the fall will just cost you a helluva lot more on Ektachrome.

To have a look at the wizards behind some of the films in cinemas last year we went to this year’s Academy Awards. The ceremony has just wrapped and there was a handful of films nominated for awards that were all shot on Kodak film stocks, here are our favourites.

We previously introduced you to The Kodakery podcast in our photography podcasts roundup, and with our favourite films listed here we’ve linked to a Kodak behind the scenes page where you can hear a little about the creative and stylistic decisions behind using film to shoot these movies, what cameras they were shot on and other tech info for you to geek out on.

 

BlacKkKlansman — A Spike Lee Joint

What was on the reel?  | KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219, KODAK VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207, KODAK EASTMAN DOUBLE-X Black & White Negative Film 5222/7222, KODAK EKTACHROME Film.

Tell me more. 

 

The Favourite — A Film By Yorgos Lanthimos

What was on the reel?  | KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219, KODAK VISION3 200T Color Negative Film 5213, KODAK VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203

 

Shoplifters — A film by Hirokazu Kore-eda

What was on the reel?   |   KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219

Tell me more.

 

A Quiet Place — A film by John Krasinski

What was on the reel? | KODAK VISION3 500T Color Negative Film 5219, KODAK VISION3 250D Color Negative Film 5207, KODAK VISION3 50D Color Negative Film 5203

Tell me more. 

 

Feature image—Shoplifters, kodak.com

 


 

You can find all the movies shot on Kodak motion films from 2019 here and the 2018 analogue nominees here. Thanks for reading.